Ask Chuck the RV Insurance Expert: When Accidents Happen

chuckInsurance

Dear Chuck,

My college-age son took my trailer out for a weekend with his friends. We’re pleased he has the camping bug like his mom and dad. Unfortunately, when they got to the campground and set up, they forgot to place the stabilizers down in the trailer. When piling in at the end of the night, it tipped over. My son and his friends are okay, but they caused a fair amount of damage to the trailer. Is this covered by insurance?

 

 

Thanks,
Upset

Dear Upset,

I’m glad to hear everyone (except the trailer), is okay. Surprisingly, situations such as this are not that uncommon. In the excitement of the moment, it’s easy to forget the little things. Let me stress the importance of making a checklist before and after your trip to remind you of the little details that keep your trips safe.

The good news is because this incident was sudden and accidental (one of the definitions of an accident), you may be covered if you have Comprehensive and Collision coverage on the trailer.

There are two types of insurance commonly associated with travel trailers.

The first is coverage added on to your auto policy. So, you just make a change to your policy that expands your coverage to include trailering your RV. Insurance people usually call this addition an endorsement, or a rider. Usually, this kind of coverage is only in effect when the trailer is actually connected to your car.

The second is a specialized RV policy that covers the trailer and its contents regardless of whether it is connected to your vehicle or standing alone.

It’s important to know the differences between the two. Your insurance company or local agent can help you be sure you have the proper type of insurance for your needs.

When these types of accidents happen, you may damage some of the items you carry with you while on the road. Make sure to account for everything that has been damaged. If you have a specialized RV policy, those damaged items will most likely be covered.

Hopefully your son understands how to avoid these problems in the future. You may want to walk family members through the setup before letting them hit the road with your beloved trailer.

Chuck Mozingo enjoys RVing with his wife, two kids and their dog, Scout. They RV near their hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, along with their favorite spot, Williwaw Campground in Whittier, Alaska. When RVing, Chuck can’t live without his iPod, s’mores and family thumb war tournaments. When he’s not hitting the open road, Chuck is the RV Product Manager for Progressive Insurance, where he has worked for nearly 20 years.

 

 

 

 

  • JERZEY JOE

    BUMMER

    • Chuck Mozingo

      Sea Sick – I’m with you and have the same problem with my own travel trailer. My kids jumping around make me reminisce about the water bed and lava lamps I had in college. There are two contraptions I’ve seen used with success: the first is investing in a decent set of inter tire locking x chocks and the second (when not on a concrete pad) using wider boards, or mats under the levelers for my trailer. I don’t have a fifth wheel but I’ve received some positive feedback as well the single point leveling system for your stabilizers (hydraulic I believe). This may be a bit on the pricey side, I’m not that familiar. Enjoy and best wishes. Chuck

  • JERZEY JOE

    WHAT CLASS OF TRAILER ?

  • SEA SICK

    Chuck
    I have a 5th wheel – I put down and level the rig. 2 front, 3 back and one on the 5th wheel (triangle).

    it still rocks and roll, when my wife and I are in it.

    Any way to stop this – starting to get SEA SICK..

    • bob

      purchase to B&L wheel chocks, the ones that u expand beetween the tires, I use them on my 27 ft ultalight travel trailer and they work great. most of the weight sits on the axles and this really locks them together. they make several styles so make sure you measure the distance between your wheels and get the proper application. it’s worth the investment, good luck
      Bob, CT

    • Chuck Mozingo

      Sea Sick – I’m with you and have the same problem with my own travel trailer. My kids jumping around make me reminisce about the water bed and lava lamps I had in college. There are two contraptions I’ve seen used with success: the first is investing in a decent set of inter tire locking x chocks and the second (when not on a concrete pad) using wider boards, or mats under the levelers for my trailer. I don’t have a fifth wheel but I’ve received some positive feedback as well the single point leveling system for your stabilizers (hydraulic I believe). This may be a bit on the pricey side, I’m not that familiar. Enjoy and best wishes. Chuck

  • Dwight Rooker

    I currently have a Progressive policy but I found out they don’t offer glass breakage on North Carolina policys. I may have to cancel due to the lack of coverage. What’s the deal?

    • Chuck Mozingo

      Mr Rooker, thanks for your question. Progressive does offer a 0 deductible windshield endorsement, and in our standard policies, if you repair your windshield (or glass) you will not be charged a deductible. In fact, if your windshield is broken but no other damage occurs to the vehicle, you will not be charged a deductible. The 0 deductible windshield endorsement we offer further protects you by not resetting your disappearing deductible if you have a loss and also removing the deductible on your glass, regardless of whether or not there is other damage to the vehicle. I hope this helps, if it doesn’t, feel free to call us for further clarification. Chuck

  • Garry Cole

    See you are from Cleveland. If you ever get a chance. If you ever get chance, come down & visit us at Shelby/Mansfield KOA. http://www.Shelby/mansfieldkoa.com.